The Legacy of Priscilla Doyle Tucker Clark

Priscilla Doyle was one of my fifth great grandmothers. She was born in North Carolina in 1750. At the age of sixteen, Priscilla married William Willis Tucker. Together they had two children, Starling Tucker and Fannie Tucker (my fourth great grandmother). Sadly, their marriage was cut short after only four years when William died in … Continue reading The Legacy of Priscilla Doyle Tucker Clark

Images of Our Ancestors

The first photograph that includes a person was taken by Louis Daguerre in 1838. It was a Paris street scene that included a man having his shoes shined. The reason he's visible is because he was stationary for the entire seven minutes the exposure took. The rest of the street appears deserted because the moving traffic … Continue reading Images of Our Ancestors

“Bloody Bill” Cunningham

When the American war for independence started, William Cunningham of South Carolina joined the Continental Army as part of that state's 3rd regiment. But, by 1778, Cunningham had switched sides, becoming an ardent Tory, ruthless in his dealings with those opposing the crown. During the fall of 1781, Cunningham commanded a regiment that terrorized South … Continue reading “Bloody Bill” Cunningham

“Gone With the Wind” Premier

On December 15, 1939, one of the biggest things to happen in Atlanta since the Civil War took place. The premier of the motion picture adaption of Margaret Mitchell’s “Gone With the Wind” was held at the Lowe’s Grand Theater downtown. It was said at the time that more people lined Peachtree Street to see … Continue reading “Gone With the Wind” Premier

The Postmaster of Bill Arp

James Cicero Hunt was the brother of Ida Hunt Huckaby, my second great grandmother. He and his family settled in Douglas County sometime in the 1880s and many members of the Hunt and Huckaby families were living there by the turn of the century. James Cicero owned the Goode Hunt Store off what is now … Continue reading The Postmaster of Bill Arp

Pollard Brown, Patriot

Pollard Brown is one of my fifth great grandfathers on my father's side. He was born in 1763 in Culpepper, Virginia when the state was still a British colony. Pollard was the sixth of eleven children born to Abraham and Jane Brown. Jane was a Pollard before she married and gave her maiden name to … Continue reading Pollard Brown, Patriot

James Hughes, Methodist Pastor

James Edmund Hughes is my wife's second great grandfather and therefore a third great grandfather of our children. He was born May 28, 1824 in Franklin County, Georgia. Franklin County, named for Benjamin Franklin, was created in 1784 out of Creek and Cherokee lands acquired during the cession of 1783 and became Georgia's eighth county … Continue reading James Hughes, Methodist Pastor

Wounded at Okinawa

From April 1 to June 22, 1945 one of the most important battles of the Second World War in the Pacific raged, the battle of Okinawa. When all was said and done more than 20,000 American troops had been killed making it the second most lethal battle in U.S. history. In the midst of that … Continue reading Wounded at Okinawa

Civil War Letter

This letter was written by my third great grandfather, Noah Richardson Smith in 1862 in the midst of the Civil War. I found the text of the letter among family documents after my father died in 2013. The original letter, according to my father's records, is in possession of a Henryetta Green of Greenville, South … Continue reading Civil War Letter

The Illustrious Wardlaws

When researching family history, you find that some families have an influence beyond their direct descendants, an influence that reaches the larger community and even the nation. Such is the case with the Wardlaw family. I'm related to the Wardlaws through my great, great grandmother Jane Moore Farlow. Her great grandfather was James Wardlaw. After … Continue reading The Illustrious Wardlaws